The coronavirus opens another gap in Europe

The south slows down and the north carries on. On Friday, April 17, the number of people on the streets in Europe rose again to over 40% for the first time in the last month

Published On: April 23rd, 2020
The coronavirus opens another gap in Europe_62cca9c70b2a8.jpeg
The coronavirus opens another gap in Europe_62cca9c70b2a8.jpeg

The coronavirus opens another gap in Europe

The south slows down and the north carries on. On Friday, April 17, the number of people on the streets in Europe rose again to over 40% for the first time in the last month

This article uses data from the application created by Civio  for EDJNET  which monitors European capitals along three parameters: pedestrian, road and air traffic, comparing their daily levels with their usual pre-crisis levels. The methodology can be found at the end of this article and in the actual tool.

By March 15th, half of the people who regularly walk along the streets of European capitals had vanished. Europe had already recorded  around 40,000 confirmed cases of Covid-19. A few days later, the number of people on the streets continued to fall, while the number of those infected kept growing. In the following weeks the number of pedestrians was around 30% of the regular levels. And it has remained that way until now, almost a month and a half later, when we are experiencing a slight resurgence in mobility thanks to confinement measures being relaxed in some countries. On Friday, April 17th, the occupation of European streets rose above 40% of the usual levels for the first time in a month. By then, there were more than 765.000 confirmed cases and more than 76.000 deaths  in the European Union.

But this comeback to normal is not homogeneous across Europe. Cities such as Athens, Zagreb, Copenhagen and Berlin have seen an increase in the number of passers-by over the last week. In Madrid, Rome and Paris, with much more restrictive measures, the occupation is still very low, almost always flat and below 20%. As of April 17th , Italy (more than 22,000), Spain (more than 19,000) and France (almost 18,000) are the three EU countries with the highest number of covid-related deaths. The exception: Lisbon, where pedestrian mobility is similar, below 20%, even if the number of deaths in Portugal (