Media: Younger Europeans are turning away from TV and print (but not from newspaper websites)

A research released at the end of October shows that young people are about twice as likely to get news online than from TV. They also tend to be more critical of the news media's performance and coverage of key issues.

A research from Pew Research Center on adults aged 18 to 29 and released at the end of October shows that young people are about twice as likely to get news online than from TV. They also tend to be more critical of the news media's performance and coverage of key issues.

The research surveyed 16,114 adults across 8 countries: Denmark, France, the U.K., Sweden, Spain, the Netherlands, Italy, and Germany. Those countries represent 69 percent of the EU population and 75 percent of the EU economy.

In general, younger adults (under 30) trust less news media and are less likely to think news media is doing a good job: if the rarely read news on print supports, they can easily name a newspaper brand as their source of news. For instance in Spain younger adults name El País as top news source, while people ages 30-49 and those 50 and older name a the public broadcaster RTVE. Only exception: UK, here a public broadcaster (the BBC) dominates as the main news source across all age groups.

The research also highlights another aspect: young Western Europeans are also particularly critical of the way that news media covers topics like immigration, economy and crime: “In Denmark, for example, about half of those under 30 (49 percent) say news media are doing a good job covering immigration, compared with 74 percent of those 50 and older, a gap of 25 percentage points”, says the research.